Our mission: to love ourselves, every last inch! To support others, help build positive self esteem! This is The Body Peace Revolution!

This is a place of encouragement, a place to talk about body image, a place for feeling beautiful. No matter what you look like, what color, what gender, what size or however many "flaws", healthy, not healthy, working on it, we are all human, we all deserve to be happy, we all deserve to love ourselves. With this blog you will see all kinds of REAL bodies, REAL people, REAL stories.

-PLEASE READ FAQ before messaging

-BE AWARE some posts may be triggering depending on submissions, check for trigger warnings and tags. Also any harassment will be met with blocking and a report to Tumblr Support

 

The 'Sexy Lie' We Should Be Talking About

"I am here today to talk about a lie." That’s how politics professor Caroline Heldman opened her Jan. 2013 TEDxYouth San Diego talk on the topic of sexual objectification. "I’d like to talk specifically about the lie, or the idea…

locsgirl:


"Reduce cellulite. Be gone dry skin. Vanish unwanted facial hair. Diminish stretch marks. Fade age spots. Eliminate feminine odor. Lose weight. Dissolve belly fat. Erase wrinkles. I think someone wants me to disappear."
~Guerrilla Girls

This is essentially every cover of every magazine marketed to women.

locsgirl:

"Reduce cellulite. Be gone dry skin. Vanish unwanted facial hair. Diminish stretch marks. Fade age spots. Eliminate feminine odor. Lose weight. Dissolve belly fat. Erase wrinkles. I think someone wants me to disappear."

~Guerrilla Girls

This is essentially every cover of every magazine marketed to women.

(Source: tempeh-princess)

"You’re not fat, you’re beautiful!" I get messages like this all the time, and it makes me so sad.
I am fat. Every stranger on the street, every medical professional, every concern troll on the internet, and every restaurant booth I can’t fit into would unanimously agree that I am, indeed, fat.
I am beautiful, too. From my red hair to my thunder thighs to my big belly to my gorgeous lips, I am in love with my body. But my love affair with my body is a personal one, and using my beauty as some kind of validation doesn’t sit right with me.
I could have mismatched eyes, “too much” body hair, I could have one leg or three thumbs or a flat chest. I could shave my head or have pockmarks, be riddled in stretchmarks and cellulite, I could be what most people would consider “butt ugly.” And it doesn’t matter. It wouldn’t make me any less worthy of love, of respect, of happiness and decency. It shouldn’t lessen my chances of living a happy and fulfilling life, chasing my dreams and not worrying about being harassed.
If you truly want to empower a person with a compliment, don’t go with the physical. Tell them they’re an amazing artist, talk about how empathetic or what a good listener they are. Tell them they bake a lasagna that’s to die for. Tell them they’ve always been there when you need them and you appreciate that.
We live in a culture that’s beauty obsessed. Just look at any magazine, any ad for makeup or clothes. Beauty means success, sex, worth. Complimenting someone strictly based on their physical appearance only exacerbates these unfair beauty ideals. I know I’m guilty of it, I do it all the time, even today I did it! But just think about your reasons for doing it.
Beauty is overrated. How awesome a person is and how they treat the people around them? That’s the ticket!

Love,
Amber
(reposted from my instagram, feel free to follow!)
(necklace from Fancy Lady Industries!)

"You’re not fat, you’re beautiful!" I get messages like this all the time, and it makes me so sad.

I am fat. Every stranger on the street, every medical professional, every concern troll on the internet, and every restaurant booth I can’t fit into would unanimously agree that I am, indeed, fat.

I am beautiful, too. From my red hair to my thunder thighs to my big belly to my gorgeous lips, I am in love with my body. But my love affair with my body is a personal one, and using my beauty as some kind of validation doesn’t sit right with me.

I could have mismatched eyes, “too much” body hair, I could have one leg or three thumbs or a flat chest. I could shave my head or have pockmarks, be riddled in stretchmarks and cellulite, I could be what most people would consider “butt ugly.” And it doesn’t matter. It wouldn’t make me any less worthy of love, of respect, of happiness and decency. It shouldn’t lessen my chances of living a happy and fulfilling life, chasing my dreams and not worrying about being harassed.

If you truly want to empower a person with a compliment, don’t go with the physical. Tell them they’re an amazing artist, talk about how empathetic or what a good listener they are. Tell them they bake a lasagna that’s to die for. Tell them they’ve always been there when you need them and you appreciate that.

We live in a culture that’s beauty obsessed. Just look at any magazine, any ad for makeup or clothes. Beauty means success, sex, worth. Complimenting someone strictly based on their physical appearance only exacerbates these unfair beauty ideals. I know I’m guilty of it, I do it all the time, even today I did it! But just think about your reasons for doing it.

Beauty is overrated. How awesome a person is and how they treat the people around them? That’s the ticket!

Love,

Amber

(reposted from my instagram, feel free to follow!)

(necklace from Fancy Lady Industries!)

stophatingyourbody:

This is a series of ads from the early 20th century right up to the 1970s.

You might notice what they’re advertising is, instead of the weight loss solutions we’re used to today, they’re actually advertising weight GAIN.

‘It’s hard to believe they once called me skinny!’

‘Skinny girls are NOT glamour girls!’

‘a skinny, scarecrow figure is neither fashionable nor glamourous!’

‘thousands quickly gaining beauty-bringing pounds!’

Notice how less than a hundred years ago, these ads were meant to shame thin bodies the way weight loss ads shame fat bodies today? Notice that how as time goes by, the ‘ideal’ body shape changes from era to era? Notice how in these ads as well as those seen today, they’re meant to make people feel bad about the way they look?

These ads are just as bad as the ones that run today. They’re meant to shame you and make you feel inadequate for one sole reason: so you go out and spend money on their products. It’s not about your self esteem, your health, or your happiness. It’s about selling the product. It’s about making the money. 

Your body is NOT wrong. You don’t need pills, diets, or supplements to make you happy, attractive, or ‘right’. All bodies are good bodies. It doesn’t matter if you’re skinny, fat, tall, short, disabled, scarred, anything at all.

Do not let the media dictate what you think you should be. The media is fickle. It does not care about you. Don’t let yourself care about what it says.

Love,

Amber

BE BRAVE! JOIN THE BODY PEACE REVOLUTION!

This is Roy A. Cui. He is a digital retoucher. His job is to digitally manipulate and ‘perfect’ the images that you and I see every day in ads and magazines.

At great personal risk, Roy has made this video to speak out against retouching and to talk about how nothing you see is real, how the women he retouches don’t even look like the finished product.

His goal with this video is “trying to get magazines that focus on fashion, beauty and the female lifestyle to print ONE UNretouched image of a model per publication for the summer of 2012. ”

Roy says in this video that he knows he might be committing career suicide, but he knows that it’s so important to get this message out.

Watch this video and share it with as many people you can. And more importantly, please, please remember not to judge yourself against people you see on TV or in magazines who aren’t even real.

Love,

Amber

BE BRAVE! JOIN THE BODY PEACE REVOLUTION!