This is a place of encouragement, a place to discuss body image, insecurities, self-esteem, and everything under the umbrella of fighting self-hate and finding self-love.

No matter what you look like, what color, what gender, sexual orientation, what size or however many "flaws", healthy, not healthy, working on it, abled, disabled, we are all human, we all deserve to be happy, we all deserve to love ourselves. With this blog you will see all kinds of REAL bodies, REAL people, REAL stories.

-PLEASE READ FAQ before messaging

-BE AWARE some posts may be triggering depending on submissions, check for trigger warnings and tags. Also any harassment will be met with blocking and a report to Tumblr Support

 

fuckyeahftmsofcolor:

Ah, first time submitting here, but why not.My name is Todd. I’m hispanic/nat.amer/white mixed and have been transitioning for almost three years, on testosterone for about 1 1/2, from Texas.
I’m a laidback guy for the most part. Big into comics, harry potter, books, star trek and pretty much most other geek-related things. I listen to all kinds of music, worked at a renaissance festival for 5 years and am a severe tattoo enthusiast.
Always up for making new friends and the likes.Hit me up: http://jason-peeta-todd.tumblr.com 

fuckyeahftmsofcolor:

Ah, first time submitting here, but why not.
My name is Todd. I’m hispanic/nat.amer/white mixed and have been transitioning for almost three years, on testosterone for about 1 1/2, from Texas.

I’m a laidback guy for the most part. Big into comics, harry potter, books, star trek and pretty much most other geek-related things. I listen to all kinds of music, worked at a renaissance festival for 5 years and am a severe tattoo enthusiast.

Always up for making new friends and the likes.
Hit me up: http://jason-peeta-todd.tumblr.com 

kararikue:

Pictures of me and my dance partner Freedom LeMoi at this year’s Dancing with the Queer Stars.

Photos by Abena Sharon Dale of the Chicago Alliance of African American Photographers

Here’s the thing

latinagabi:

I know I have an ‘ambiguous’ look.

I know that when most people look at me they’re going to try to put me in their little box, and label me.They need me “figured out”

But here’s the thing,

As a Latina, I am a mix of different ethnicities,

As someone who was born in Ecuador but was partly raised in Spain and Canada to mixed parents who have a lot of different cultural differences…

When you ask me what I am I can not give you a simple answer for many different reasons

1. I am human. Stop asking me ‘what’ I am as if I was another species.

2. Yes I was born in Ecuador. NO, I can not simply say I’m Ecuadorian because I only lived there for the first 3 years of my life to mixed parents, not to mention the fact that unfortunately I know very little to Ecuadorian culture, and calling myself an Ecuadorian while being ignorant of their culture does not sit right with me.

3. While I do admit that a big part of my ‘cultural influence’ is heavily Canadian/North American, I do not consider myself Canadian. Spanish culture has also played a big part in my upbringing, however, my parents didn’t raise me according to any specific cultural background.

I don’t identify myself with one particular thing, I don’t think I need to, the only time I consider it is when I’m asked about it. I’m a mix and I love it, there is no written rule that says I can only be one thing. I consider myself a blend of Latina, Spanish and North American, that’s the easiest way I can put it. If you don’t like it, and you tell me I should just call myself A or B, please fuck off, you don’t get to tell me how I should identify myself.

One more thing, while I’m flattered that you think my dark skin is ‘beautiful’ or ‘exotic’ remember two things, 

1. don’t touch my skin without permission simply because you’re in ‘awe’ of it, seriously wtf.

2. It’s exotic to you because you have been conditioned to think that anything other than white is exotic, even though most of the world is not white. 

That’s all for now :)

tostones-de-pana:

I need more pictures of me with my hair in it’s natural curly state. I used to hate my hair curly when I was a kid. I used to wish so bad that my hair would be straight and that my life would be easier. I didn’t know how to take care of it and always hated how it could get frizzy. Now… I like my curls a lot. I’ve learned more about caring for them and I get a lot of compliments. Also if I ever want to rock straight I can do that too. It gives me versatility. In Puerto Rico right now every one is doing these Keratin treatments to straighten their hair. When I was visiting, my aunt thought I should get it done too. I declined and told her I liked my hair as is and really didn’t want to bother or waste the money. I get asked a lot if my hair is REALLY my hair all the time too. I think my hair is unique and I keep it like this most of the time.

.

nuestrahermana:

Pin Ups of Color & Burlesque Dancers too! 

A Series by NuestraHermana

Yolanda “Tongolele” Móntes

Yolanda Móntes also known as ”Tongolele” or “La Tongolele” is an iconic burlesque dancer and actor of Mexican cinema. She was born in Spokane, Washington in 1932 on March 3rd. She is multiracial and is Mexican, Spanish (from her Father’s side), French and Tahitian (Mother’s side). 

“Tongalele explained that her stage name recalled the Polynesian Island Tongo, but it’s rhythms evoked the sound of drums. Tongalele noted that because she became one of the greatest attractions in Havana’s well known tropicana, people from Miami and South America believed she is Cuban.” (from Queering Mestizaje: Transculturation And Performance by Alicia Arrizon pg. 108)

She was passionate about dance from a young age and became a professional dancer when she was only fifteen years old. In 1947, she made her debut as a dancer at the Tivoli Theater in Mexico.

Her work is seen as an iconic staple to the Golden Era of Mexican Cinema. She became well known in Cuba, South America, Mexico, Europe and the United States. She worked with well known actors such as Tin-Tan and Pedro Infante. She was a part of over 25 films including: Nocturne of Love (1947), El Rey Del Barrio (1949), King’s Neighborhood (1950) and Han Matado A Tongolele (1948) and many more. You can read an entire list of her work here.

Her work is best known from the 1940’s to 1980. She is to this day still performing on television and live at select clubs and events. Her style of dance was extremely energetic and her cultural background was infused in to it. Her dance was also developed by the women who she performed with and learned from along the way. One particular group being “Las Mulatas Del Fuego” a group of Afro-Cubanas who traveled Cuba and Mexico performing (pictured together in picture 5 of this photoset). Her performances inspired many “classical” burlesque numbers.

Below, two of her captivating and beautiful performances can be watched: 

Clip from Rey Del Barrio (1949)

Continue to check back for this continuing series archiving in detail the history of pin ups & burlesque dancers of color! Women who are so often left out of the books, websites and other important documenting projects on pin up & burlesque history. As the series grows you can check out a list of them here.